Prevailing Wage Question and Answer

Question: How many states have prevailing wage laws?

Answer: 33 states approved some version of prevailing wage.

Question: When was the last time a state enacted prevailing wage?

Answer: Minnesota, Tennessee and Vermont were the last 3 states to enact prevailing wage, in the early 1970’s.

Question: How many states have repealed prevailing wage?

Answer: Nine states have repealed prevailing wage laws – Alabama (repealed 1980), Arizona (‘84), Colorado (‘85), Florida (‘79), Idaho (‘85), Kansas (‘87), Louisiana (‘88), New Hampshire (‘85), Utah (‘81).

Question: How many states have enacted prevailing wage laws since the 9 states listed above have repealed prevailing wage laws?

Answer: None.

Question: How many states repealed prevailing wage for schools?

Answer: In 1997, Ohio repealed its prevailing wage law for new school construction. According to the Ohio Legislative Budget Office, the change resulted in a 10 percent decrease in project costs while having no virtually no impact on the quality of the construction. In addition, worker wages increased at a 77 percent greater rate than when prevailing wage was used.

Question: What does prevailing wage mean to county governments?

Answer: According to the Iowa Association of Counties, county governments spend $150 million annually on projects. They project an increase of 10 to 20 percent on project costs, which would increase annual costs by $15 million to $30 million, not counting the additional administration expense.

Question: What does prevailing wage mean to city governments?

Answer: According to the City of Des Moines, they have 71 projects worth $60 million. A conservative 5 percent increase would mean $3 million in additional costs, not counting the additional administration expense.

Additional Source: http://www.lsc.state.oh.us/membersonly/126prevailingwagelaws.pdf

Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedintumblrmail

Comments are closed.

Dansette